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This past year my wife and I were blessed to welcome the birth of our first child. For those who are parents know the thoughts that go through your mind; joy, excitement, nervousness, and worry just to name a few. The last 7 months have been the most amazing and important yet difficult time we’ve ever experienced.

Each day we watch our son grow, learn and take on life. He learns a little more and more about himself and us each day and us the same about him. The one thing I’ve noticed as he discovers life and becomes his own little person is his impressionable innocence. Everything he’s exposed to and everything he’s taught is absorbed like a sponge.

The same is true for those entering the fire service. New recruits come in as an empty slate who, for the most part don't know anyone or how anything works and will absorb everything they hear, see and read like a sponge. In order to keep the fire service family and brotherhood alive, it is upon us, the current generation to do our best to not allow any negative emotions or feelings towards a fellow firefighter and departmental policies be absorbed by the newer generations coming in. The best thing we could do is to look at the things we don't agree with and turn it into a positive remembering why we signed up for this job. Just like babies, new recruits are excited and have an eagerness to learn, grow and a hunger to prove themselves worthy of this job. So let's embrace the newer generations entering the fire service and show them that although there is downsides to what we do, we can always walk in with a smile on our face,  have an eagerness to learn and a willingness to always pay it forward with the hopes of developing the generations to come.

Until next time; work hard, stay safe & live inspired

About the Author

NICHOLAS J. HIGGINS is a firefighter with 17 years in the fire service in Piscataway, NJ, a NJ State certified level 2 fire instructor, a State of New Jersey Advocate for the National Fallen Firefighter’s Foundation and is the founder/contributor of the Firehouse Tribune website. A martial arts practitioner and former collegiate athlete in baseball, Nick is also a National Exercise & Sports Trainer Association Battle Ropes Instructor, Functional Fitness Instructor and Nutrition Coach.  He holds a B.S. in Accounting from Kean University, and a A.A.S in Liberal Arts - Business from Middlesex County College. Nick has spoken at the 2017 & 2018 Firehouse Expo in Nashville, TN as well as at numerous fire departments within NJ and fire service podcasts.

The Dance of Life

I'm sitting in my room, studying with an intensity I didn't know I had. It's the mid 1980's and I am in middle school. My mom and I had just moved from Philadelphia, PA to Augusta, GA for her first military assignment. It might as well be a different world. There aren’t any Philly cheesesteaks and sports teams that I’m used to seeing. Yet, in this very different place, there is one thing I feel connected to; the very thing I am so intently studying: Breakdancing.

Middle school is an age where I wanted to fit in and be cool. Being prolific in breakdancing isa ticket to coolness. I carefully read, and reread my beloved practice poster (yes, there is a practice poster for breakdancing). I watch and study MTV like a must-see webinar. And the movies! Oh, I watch every single one the day it is released. Now, I’m not really all that good. Dreamsof being a dancer on a rap video are just dreams. But I can spin around on my head and not get sent to the hospital. I work at honing these skills leading up to the next military assignmentthat my mom and I take to Belgium, then Germany. During my high school years, I find to secure the social life I want, I amgoing to need to learn different dances for different occasions. Sure, breakdancing is a great fit for house parties, but what about the Semi-formal winter dance or the Formal Prom. If I amgoing to get dates and not look like a fool, I am going to need to dabble in the right kind of dancing to move my social life along.

Advancing your career with training and education is a lot like learning the right dance. All of the dances are great, but serve a different purpose.

• Dances at the house party is down to earth, wild, sometimes crazy or zany. In your career, this equates to training in the fire service. The drills for new people. Improving the skills of tenured people. Working with other stations and units. There is a general way it should be done, but there is room for creativity.

• Semi-formal dances have a bit more structure. These are your conferences, conventions, 1-3-day trainings. Going to regional schools. Going to FDIC and FRI. They are home grown classes that may have originated at the fire station, but are now on a bigger stage.

• Formal danceshave set expectations for how the event is happening. Dress like this. Move this way. These include official college certifications and formal classes such as Fire Officer I. They take more time and have a set structure. That structure allows for your education to be comparable to others across the world. It helps to measure your investment. It helps to increase your creditability.

Just like my dance life, you will do the most good for yourself by attending all the dances. Over reliance on station training may mean not keeping up with best practices. Over reliance on college and other formal training classes will lead to understanding theory, and not practical application. You are advancing your fire service life; your fire service career. Be sure to take part in training and education in all three parts to be ready for the big dances that are coming. And you won’t need to spin on your head, either!

Ordinary People Have Extraordinary Impact.

About the Author

 NICK BASKERVILLE Nick has had the honor of serving in the United States Air Force for 10 years, followed by 4 years in the United States Air Force Reserves. He attained the rank of Technical Sergeant (E-6). Nick also has 18 years of fire service time, with 15 years of that being in a career department in Northern Virginia. Nick has had the opportunity to hold positions in the Company Officer's section of the Virginia Fire Chief's Association (VFCA), The Virginia Fire Officer's Academy (VFOA) staff, and as one of the IABPFF representatives to the Fire Service Occupational Cancer Alliance. Nick is one of the many trainers for Firefighter Cancer Support Network (FCSN) to offer awareness and prevention training about cancer in the fire service. Nick has the honor of being one of the many contributors for The Firehouse Tribune.

What Are You Telling People?

I say “Good afternoon!How are you doing?” I am stopping to getodds and ends at a supermarket. It is atypical day during the summer here in Maryland;so being inside provides a bit of relief from the heat and humidity. The cashier is who I give this standard greeting. He is tall, lanky, and young. My guess is that this is probably his Summer job. Admittedly, I ask the question about his day out of rote practice. I just heard the conversationbetween the cashier and the person before me. I already know his answer. His response?“Oh, I can't complain.” That’s not the answer he gave the other guy.

In speaking with the person just before me, this is the response I hear him say: “Man it’s hot in here. It feels good at first, but then, it’s hot again.” Now, this is a supermarket, not a court of law. I will not prosecute him for telling me one thingand another person something else. And given that he and the other person are wearing the same uniform shirt, it makes sense. He is more comfortable with a known, coworker than anunknown, customer. We all have things that bother us. We are just not up front about telling everyone about them. And that’s fine, until you aren’t fine.

Everyone has problems.Whether or not someone will talk about them is another story. Over the last few months,firefighters in nearby jurisdictions have taken their own lives.An article from CNN article last year* states “Last year (in 2017), 103 firefighters and 140 police officers committed suicide, whereas 93 firefighters and 129 officers died in the line of duty, which includes everything from being fatally shot, stabbed, drowning or dying in a car accident while on the job.” In a discussion I had shortly after that, a question was posed to me; if I had a problem, who would I tell? Who would I tell what I felt, versus what the pre-canned answer of “Oh, I can’t complain.”

There are many people better qualified than I to speak on mental health. What I give you then, is not vast knowledge, but perspective. One that focuses on just on aspect of the problem of mental health in the fire service. Many people wouldn’t know who to tell their problems to if their life depended on it. If you had a problem, who would you tell?Not just any problem, but the kind of problem that would make you question being alive. How much trust you have in another person is proportional with how much would you revel to him or her. Who do you trust enough to tell that kind of problem?

I don’t feel like fire service culture makes it easy to talk about weakness, mistakes, and problems people tend to face. In order to have a conversation on that level, there has to be a sense of closeness between 2 people. A sense of trust.Listening to the comments of the young cashier and the guy he was talking to, they are obviously closer to each other than to me. They know each other. They have history. I'm just some dude picking up some odds and ends. No need to trust me with a problem statement.

As leaders, I ask we all take a look at what we are doing to make it easy for people to talk about problems. To find the common places and build bridges of trust and safety. Part of leadership is figuring out what that is for each individual. That's a pretty tall order. I've had a fewsuccesses and many more failures throughout my entire career.I don't know that I have a set answer. I will tell you what life has taught me so far. Keep saying “Good morning! How are you doing?” If I go back to that same store on a regular basis and interact that same cashier, eventually, we will get to know each other better. Eventually, we will talk about more things. Eventually, he’ll let me know when the heat is getting to him. Eventually, he’ll trust me enough to tell me what he really feels. Relationships are a lot like planting fruit trees. It takes a while to nurture the progress, but in the end, the fruit that is produced is worth it. As a leader, make trust your everyday order of business. Make trust ordinary, and you will see extraordinary impact.   

*From <https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2018/04/11/officers-firefighters-suicides-study/503735002/>

 About the Author

 NICK BASKERVILLE Nick has had the honor of serving in the United States Air Force for 10 years, followed by 4 years in the United States Air Force Reserves. He attained the rank of Technical Sergeant (E-6). Nick also has 18 years of fire service time, with 15 years of that being in a career department in Northern Virginia. Nick has had the opportunity to hold positions in the Company Officer's section of the Virginia Fire Chief's Association (VFCA), The Virginia Fire Officer's Academy (VFOA) staff, and as one of the IABPFF representatives to the Fire Service Occupational Cancer Alliance. Nick is one of the many trainers for Firefighter Cancer Support Network (FCSN) to offer awareness and prevention training about cancer in the fire service. Nick has the honor of being one of the many contributors for The Firehouse Tribune.

When It Rains...

It's just another day at work. More things to do than time in the day. I'm at the fire station, making my way up the stairs to fit in what I can. Up the stairs, I make my way down the walk way and take the second left. I open the office door just to drop off my coffee cup. Training is about to happen and I don’t want to be late. I don’t turn on the light, at first. But what is that sound? It reminds me of running water? That doesn’t make sense. There is no water in the office.

I turn on the light and oh my, what a sight!One of the ceiling tiles looks more like a cloud instead of a part of the ceiling. It was full of water and beginning to rain down on the entire office. The air condition system is located in the ceiling, just above the office. I have heard stories of how it leaked before. I now have my own story.

As a new officer, I'm still working through the gut reaction to be in the thick of the problem. To get directly involved on fixing the problem hands-on. On this day, however, I activate a skill that have cultivated for years.A skill perfect for this situation. That skill?Ignorance.I understand what to do with a busted hose line. I understand what to do for a spill for muriatic acid. I know nothing about what to do for a leaky ceiling. I knew enough to know, however, that there was a problem. Even officers know water is not supposed to come from the ceiling. Sizing up the situation, I knew I need more resources. Downstairsare 2-3 firefighters who would know exactly what to do. I went downstairs and hustled back with a strike team of people to handle with the problem.

What did I do? I took two steps back and supported the plumbing strike team while they worked. I handed them a wrench when asked. I held the ladder when needed. I called the maintenance person for the long-term fix. As things are windingdown, the Battalion Chief stopped by. Chief’s seem to either have a 6th sense or hidden camera that tell them when to stop by the station."Where's the guy in charge?"All fingers point to me in the corner coordinating with the HAVAC vendor on when they can fix the problem.

Sometimes being in charge means letting the right people use their skill. Especially when you don't have that skill. I have learned something long ago that I have just managed to put into words. I don't have to be the smartest person in the room in order to lead the room. Let the ordinary people have the extraordinary impact.

 About the Author

NICK BASKERVILLE has had the honor of serving in the United States Air Force for 10 years, followed by 4 years in the United States Air Force Reserves. He attained the rank of Technical Sergeant (E-6). Nick also has 16 years of fire service time, with 13 years of that being in a career department in Northern Virginia. Nick has had the opportunity to hold positions in the Company Officer's section of the Virginia Fire Chief's Association (VFCA), The Virginia Fire Officer's Academy (VFOA) staff, and in the International Association of Black Professional Fire Fighters (IABPFF) as a chapter president, a Health and Wellness committee member, and one of the IABPFF representatives to the Fire Service Occupational Cancer Alliance. 

Truck Company Operations: LOVERS__U

The fire service loves acronyms and we have a lot of them. For this discussion we are going to talk about the old acronym for all you truckies out there – LOVERS_U. Before we get into the acronym and details of it, let’s first talk simply about truck company ops.

Truck operations involve a variety of tasks; forcible entry, search, rescue, ventilation, ladder operations (ground/aerial), overhaul, etc. Nowadays with the lack of manpower, squad and engine companies may be needed to perform these operations at any time on the fire ground and are equipped with the tools to do so. Some engine companies may need to perform both truck and engine operations due to lack of manpower or the absence of a truck on scene and vice versa for companies who run quints.

Well here we are, a truck company; what do we do?

Let’s being here with LOVERS_U:

1. Size-up (Yes, truck has its own size up to do). Everything we do on the fire ground calls for a scene size up (and a continual one) to better help us make smart tactical decisions to effectively complete our tasks especially with ventilation. Can this start the LOVERS_U? Hmm….

2. Forcible Entry, if needed (for searching and fire suppression). Sometimes the doors may be unlocked so like they say, “trybefore you pry”. This action should be determined quickly upon arrival in the case of victim removals. Please remember to keep this simple. Remembering your basic tools such as the irons, a hook and/or saw along with variations or combinations of each, can save time and get the job done. The key here is to know your tools and how to use them efficiently.

3. Search (Rescue, if needed). This is very important because we are not only searching for victims but searching for fire both of which may or may not be identifiable from the outside which is why searching is critical on the fire ground. Let’s remember searching for fire can also be done by the suppression team as well. Don’t forget your TIC.

4. a. Ventilation for search team (Vent for life). By venting for life, it is allowing a lot of the thick, black smoke remove itself from the structure giving search teams inside better visibility and time for locating victims.

b. Ventilation for fire suppression (Vent for fire). By venting for fire, this assists the fire suppression team in making an easier push to the fire and much easier extinguishment. This is done with very precise communication between your crew, the suppression team inside and the IC. If done haphazardly, this can be catastrophic.

5. Ladder the building (ingress, egress, vertical/horizontal vent). Every window accessible should have a ladder on it for emergency egress and also for access to the roof and 2nd floor windows for vertical vent. Why not throw a ladder up while heading with your crew to your assignment? Kill 2 birds with 1 stone.

6. Overhaul/Salvage. Once the fire is determined to be out, now it’s time to get inside and open the place up. This is to look for any hotspots and perform another search should any victims have not been found. During this operation, SCBA is still required along with a TIC and hand tools. Using tarps are also considered to help salvage as much property as possible and avoid any smoke and/or water damage.

7. Utilities. This is also known as shutting  down the utilities. Depending on where the utilities are located, this is done by either an interior crew or an exterior crew. Having control of gas, electric and water will help increase the safety of all fire service personnel on the scene.

Now that we discussed primary responsibilities of the truck company, we can now collectively say we have described and discussed LOVERS_U. For all those on truck companies or working with truck company responsibilities keep this acronym in your toolbox when pulling up to a scene, during your pre plans and in your training. It’s a valuable guide to helping you get the job done efficiently, effectively and most importantly safely. 

Until next time; work hard, stay safe & live inspired.

 About the Author

 NICHOLAS J. HIGGINS is a firefighter with 16 years in the fire service in Piscataway, NJ as well as NJ State certified level 2 fire instructor and currently a State of New Jersey Advocate for the National Fallen Firefighter’s Foundation. A martial arts practitioner in Taekwondo, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Muay Thai as well as a former collegiate athlete in baseball, Nick is also a National Exercise & Sports Trainer Association Battle Ropes Instructor and studying for the Functional Fitness Instructor certification.  He holds a B.S. in Accounting from Kean University and is the founder/contributor of the Firehouse Tribune website.

Improve Your Cholesterol, Improve Your Career

Heart Disease is the leading cause of death of both men and women in the United States. It’s also one the leading causes of death in firefighters and for more than 1 reason. However, in this article we are discussing it with its link to cholesterol. So what is cholesterol and what does it due to our bodies?

For starters, cholesterol is a fat found in your blood that is developed in the liver but your body can also receive it from meat, fish, eggs, butter, cheese, and whole or low-fat milk. Everyone needs some cholesterol in their bodies in order to function properly such as your brain, skin and bodily organs. What cholesterol is doing for your body is acting a building block for your cells as well as helping repair damaged cells especially ones found in the blood vessels and the dietary tract.

If cholesterol is helping your body, why is it bad?

Well, foodhigh in additives, preservatives and other toxic processes will cause cells to become damaged and are most likely found in refined and processed carbohydrates. This will cause the cholesterol to flow around the blood and eventually cling onto the walls of your blood vessels, thus causing the vessels to become narrower as time goes on eventually clogging the vessels. A clogged vessel does not allow for proper blood flow through the vessel potentially causing a heart attack (lack of oxygen-rich blood)or stroke (decreased blood flow to thebrain) to name a few.

To be on top of our game and have long lasting career and life, we can as firefighters help ourselves and families to help improve our cholesterol levels.

1. Eat heart-healthy foods

a. Healthier Fats

i. Saturated fats, founds in red meat and dairy will raise your total cholesterol levels and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) also known as “bad” cholesterol. Rule of thumb: 7% or less of your daily caloric intake should be from saturated fats.

ii. Leaner cuts of meat such as London broil, top sirloin, chicken breast, 96% lean ground beef and pork tenderloin are other healthier options along with low-fat dairy and monounsaturated fats which is found in olive and canola oils.

b. Eliminate Trans Fats

i. Trans fats affect cholesterol levels by increasing LDL levels (“bad”) and lowering the (“good”) HDL levels. Trans fats can be found in fried foods and many processed foods such as cookies, crackers and snack cakes. In the U.S., food containing less than 0.5 grams of trans fat per serving is consider “trans fat-free”.

c. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

i. Omega-3’s don’t have an effect on LDL cholesterol (“bad”) however it does have heart benefits. Some benefits omega-3 has are helping to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL or “good”), reducing triglycerides (type of fat in blood) and reduces blood pressure.

ii. Types of fish rich in omega-3 are salmon, mackerel and herring. Other good sources include krill oil, walnuts and almonds.

d. Soluble Fiber

i. There are 2 types of fiber – soluble and insoluble. Although both have heart-health benefits, soluble fiber also helps to lower your LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and all you’ll need to do is all a little more fiber to your diet.

ii. High in fiber foods are oats, fruits, beans, lentils and vegetables.

e. Whey Protein

i. Whey protein given as a supplement according to studies has shown to lower both LDL and total cholesterol. So if you’re in the gym, at home or in the firehouse working out and GETTING AFTER IT, don’t forget to include whey protein in your diet.

2. Exercise

i. Exercise has been known to improve cholesterol especially help raise HDL (“good”) cholesterol. Before engaging in any physical activities, please consult with your physician beforehand.

If you want a long, healthy and prosperous career and a long life with your family your health comes first. Protecting the front lines and take care of our own comes above all else. Please remember to consult with your physician before looking into any of these recommendations as this is for informational purposes.

Until next time; work hard, stay safe & live inspired.

About the Author

NICHOLAS J. HIGGINS is a firefighter with 16 years in the fire service in Piscataway, NJ, a NJ State certified level 2 fire instructor and a State of New Jersey Advocate for the National Fallen Firefighter’s Foundation. A martial arts practitioner in Taekwondo, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Muay Thai as well as a former collegiate athlete in baseball, Nick is a National Exercise & Sports Trainer Association Battle Ropes Instructor and studying for the Functional Fitness Instructor certification.  He holds a B.S. in Accounting from Kean University and is the founder/contributor of the Firehouse Tribune website.  

The Unexpected Church Lesson

My kid, Baby Girl, is a church baby. If you're not familiar with what that is, allow me to explain. A church baby is a kid that,from birth, has been raised and mentored in all things church. And I mean ALL things. He or she in the church children's choir, even if the "gift" of singing isn't theirs. He or she is apart of the children's ministry, even though they never ask to be. He or she is expected to go to children's bible study to learn all the rules that grown folk break. He or she gets dressed in the latest clothes for the latest church holiday. The duty of church baby lastsfar longer than being an infant.Baby Girl is 6 but will always be a part of the church baby alumni.

Church babies do get a stipend. This is normally paid out in candy and one-dollar bills. More so candy, than money. Still, not a bad weekly haul. The people who fund these payments are the elders of the church family, Pastor, Church Mothers, and Church Uncles and Aunts. Ever since she was born, Baby Girl has gotten candy and money from these elders. Except for one person. One Church Mother, small in stature, with big glasses and an even bigger smile. She makes payments in the form of books. Ever since Baby Girl was born, this wise Church Mother regularly, and unassumingly, gives her one or two books every few weeks. From church stories to Dr. Seuss.From classics Church Mother read as a kid, to new storiesfor the new ages. Baby Girl loves the books! She looks forward to the books. And when she gets new books from Church Mother, we absolutely have to read them right away.

I love the books too! Beyond the colorful characters and simple adventures, there is always a wise nugget to learn. A bit if knowledge to be bestowed. Something that when I want Baby Girl to understand life, I can refer to one of the many books we read. Question for you: What books of wisdom and knowledge are you giving people? We all make our way through life collecting books; wisdom and knowledge. Have you shared your books with anyone? Younger members of your organization? Of your group? Of your family?

Passing on wisdom and knowledge should come from wise elders and thought leaders, right? When I sometimes feel I have nothing to offer anyone, I remember this statement that was told to me: “To the third grader, the fifth grader is an expert.”You don’t have to know all the answers to life to enrich some else’s life. Give what you have. You have no idea how much someone would enjoy your story. That seeming ordinary story, that can have an extraordinary impact.

 About the Author  

 NICK BASKERVILLE has had the honor of serving in the United States Air Force for 10 years, followed by 4 years in the United States Air Force Reserves. He attained the rank of Technical Sergeant (E-6). Nick also has 16 years of fire service time, with 13 years of that being in a career department in Northern Virginia. Nick has had the opportunity to hold positions in the Company Officer's section of the Virginia Fire Chief's Association (VFCA), The Virginia Fire Officer's Academy (VFOA) staff, and in the International Association of Black Professional Fire Fighters (IABPFF) as a chapter president, a Health and Wellness committee member, and one of the IABPFF representatives to the Fire Service Occupational Cancer Alliance.

 

A Perfect TIN

My choice of title may have you question my high school diploma. It may also have you question if I understand the difference between self-confidence and being self-absorbed.  Rest assured, my diploma is valid, and many of life's lessonshave kept me humble.After spending just over a year on an ambulance as a probationary supervisor, I learned a number of things. Three of those things that come to mind can be put together in the acronym TIN:

Theory

• This is the starting place, not the ending place. When I left home after high school, I thought to myself "Now I get to show my mom I know what I'm talking about!" like so many folks leaving home, I knew the answers that I came up with would carry me though life. Most of those answers didn't last the first year. Life as a new supervisor was no different. I already had 10 years of supervisory experience from the military. Yet, this first year I found myself tweaking and adjusting how I thought things would go. As the military saying goes, "No plan survives contact with the enemy." What theories do you have that are awaiting contact with real life situations?

Information

• When I prepared for the promotional process, there was an exercise where I interactedwith role players to show my interpersonal skills. I knew that the role player may have info that I needed. If I didn't ask for it, however, Iwasn’t going to get it. So, when it was brought to me that there was a difference between what I thought was happening my first year, and what was actually happening, I realized I didn't have all the info I needed. After talking it over with my boss, I completed a 360-degree survey at my station. I gotfeedback from my boss, other supervisors, and the firefighters there. I found where my Theory was working, and I found where it wasn't. I didn't make all the changes recommended, but I did change my approach on a number of things. Sometimes, you won't get information unless you ask for information. When is the last time you asked for more info?

Network

• Having a network is huge! You've used your Theory. You've gotten Information you didn't have before. Still coming up short on leadership answers? No problem. Phone a friend from your Network. Your Network is a grouping of people you respect and depend on to be the best version of yourself. Getting the insight and perspective of another person can be just what you need to get on the right track. Who gets to be in your network? Your mentors to start with. Getting advice from someone who cleared the path of wilderness before you can help greatly. Respected peers are some others. I was lucky enough to be at a station with 6 other supervisors that I interacted with. Each person was able to provide me with an angle I may not have considered. Don't have 6 supervisors where you work? Connect with others in your organization. Join professional groups. Attend local conferences and trainings to network with people. Finally, don't forget about the people you know, that know nothing about your job. One of the best relationships I've had thus far, is the older gentleman I used to ride with to the men's prayer breakfast. As we rode, I would just soak in all the life wisdom he was nice enough to bestow on me. Who are you calling in your Network to be a million-dollar supervisor?

Are there more lessons that I learned I that year? You bet! I’m still digesting some of them. Luckily, being a good supervisor is a process. One that I hope to get better at every day. All with the hope that one day, I’ll be an ordinary person, who had an extraordinary impact.

About the Author

 NICK BASKERVILLE has had the honor of serving in the United States Air Force for 10 years, followed by 4 years in the United States Air Force Reserves. He attained the rank of Technical Sergeant (E-6). Nick also has 16 years of fire service time, with 13 years of that being in a career department in Northern Virginia. Nick has had the opportunity to hold positions in the Company Officer's section of the Virginia Fire Chief's Association (VFCA), The Virginia Fire Officer's Academy (VFOA) staff, and in the International Association of Black Professional Fire Fighters (IABPFF) as a chapter president, a Health and Wellness committee member, and one of the IABPFF representatives to the Fire Service Occupational Cancer Alliance.

The 10 Minute Workout

One of our biggest excuses for lack of exercise is simple, it’s lack of time. Most of our time is spent working, sleeping, family obligations and friends. Very rarely do people say they have or make time for exercise, which in our profession is very unfortunate since as we’ve said in numerous posts thus far, we are “functional athletes” and need to behave, think and train like one; mentality and physically. 

In order to enjoy our life, our family, friends, combat the stress of the job and continue to feel healthy for the long haul, exercise is essential to this and what I am sharing with you all today is the 10 min work out you can do at home, in the gym, on the go and even in the firehouse alone or with your crew.

Why am I saying all of this?
According to the Department of Health and Human Services, it is recommended to have at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic pace exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise per week. Depending on how hard you work out that will equate to 21 minutes per day of moderate aerobic pace exercise or 11 minutes per day of vigorous exercise.

So here are a few options of the 10 minute workout:

1.    Jogging: This is great for cardiovascular health, lowering your blood pressure and cholesterol and is known to decrease the risk of osteoporosis. The American Council on Exercise states that an individual weighing 180lbs can burn up to 170 calories by taking a 10min jog.
2.    High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT): This is my personal favorite and although it burns calories and fat quickly, it is not recommended for beginners. HIIT is a form of interval training and cardiovascular exercise training alternating short periods of intense anaerobic exercise with less intense recovery periods. This type of workout will challenge your cardiovascular system more than jogging along with added benefits such as increasing your metabolism, improves cholesterol profile and increases insulin sensitivity. A bodyweight HIIT Workout would look something like this: 50 sit-ups, 40 jump squats (or body squats), 30 pushups, 20 split jumps, 10 triceps dips, as many burpees as possible in 30 seconds. You will take a 30 second rest between each exercise in order to perform each exercise with 100% effort. 
3.    Circuit Training: This a great strength training workout due to strength training .Generally strength training requires rest periods between sets for muscle recovery however with circuit training uses antagonistic muscles (when one muscle contracts, the other relaxes, i.e. biceps and triceps) allowing for shorter rest periods An example of this would be as follows: 3 sets of 10 reps.
a.    Pushups
b.    Hollow body hold
c.    Squats
d.    Glute bridges
e.    Bench dips
f.    Plank hold (30-60 sec holds)
4.    Jump Rope: Jumping rope can burn more than 10 calories in a minute and a great way for overall body toning. Here is a quick jump rope workout you can do anywhere. 60 seconds regular jump, 60 seconds rope side to side, 60 seconds single leg (left), 60 seconds single leg (right). The goal is to do this routine non-stop for 2 rounds. If you are new to this, do regular jumps for 60 seconds for 4 rounds with 30 second rests. For the single leg jumps, start with the weaker or less dominant side first. 

So, there you have it. Four different workouts we can do any time, any where for overall health. Incorporate these into your daily life will have you feeling healthier, stronger and battle ready to perform when the alarm goes off.  

Please note: Always consult with your physician before getting into physical activities while recovering from any injury or surgery. It may not be the best treatment option after an injury or surgery or may be limited to particular modalities.

Until next time: work hard, stay safe & live inspired.

About the Author

NICHOLAS J. HIGGINS is a firefighter with 16 years in the fire service in Piscataway, NJ as well as NJ State certified level 2 fire instructor and currently a State of New Jersey Advocate for the National Fallen Firefighter’s Foundation. He has also been elected as a township elected District Fire Commissioner for 1 term (3 years) in Piscataway, NJ from 2008-2011. A blue belt in taekwondo and former collegiate athlete, Nick is currently studying to complete his certification as a TRX Instructor and a Battle Ropes Instructor. He holds a B.S. in Accounting from Kean University and is the founder/contributor of the Firehouse Tribune website.