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This past year my wife and I were blessed to welcome the birth of our first child. For those who are parents know the thoughts that go through your mind; joy, excitement, nervousness, and worry just to name a few. The last 7 months have been the most amazing and important yet difficult time we’ve ever experienced.

Each day we watch our son grow, learn and take on life. He learns a little more and more about himself and us each day and us the same about him. The one thing I’ve noticed as he discovers life and becomes his own little person is his impressionable innocence. Everything he’s exposed to and everything he’s taught is absorbed like a sponge.

The same is true for those entering the fire service. New recruits come in as an empty slate who, for the most part don't know anyone or how anything works and will absorb everything they hear, see and read like a sponge. In order to keep the fire service family and brotherhood alive, it is upon us, the current generation to do our best to not allow any negative emotions or feelings towards a fellow firefighter and departmental policies be absorbed by the newer generations coming in. The best thing we could do is to look at the things we don't agree with and turn it into a positive remembering why we signed up for this job. Just like babies, new recruits are excited and have an eagerness to learn, grow and a hunger to prove themselves worthy of this job. So let's embrace the newer generations entering the fire service and show them that although there is downsides to what we do, we can always walk in with a smile on our face,  have an eagerness to learn and a willingness to always pay it forward with the hopes of developing the generations to come.

Until next time; work hard, stay safe & live inspired

About the Author

NICHOLAS J. HIGGINS is a firefighter with 17 years in the fire service in Piscataway, NJ, a NJ State certified level 2 fire instructor, a State of New Jersey Advocate for the National Fallen Firefighter’s Foundation and is the founder/contributor of the Firehouse Tribune website. A martial arts practitioner and former collegiate athlete in baseball, Nick is also a National Exercise & Sports Trainer Association Battle Ropes Instructor, Functional Fitness Instructor and Nutrition Coach.  He holds a B.S. in Accounting from Kean University, and a A.A.S in Liberal Arts - Business from Middlesex County College. Nick has spoken at the 2017 & 2018 Firehouse Expo in Nashville, TN as well as at numerous fire departments within NJ and fire service podcasts.

The Dance of Life

I'm sitting in my room, studying with an intensity I didn't know I had. It's the mid 1980's and I am in middle school. My mom and I had just moved from Philadelphia, PA to Augusta, GA for her first military assignment. It might as well be a different world. There aren’t any Philly cheesesteaks and sports teams that I’m used to seeing. Yet, in this very different place, there is one thing I feel connected to; the very thing I am so intently studying: Breakdancing.

Middle school is an age where I wanted to fit in and be cool. Being prolific in breakdancing isa ticket to coolness. I carefully read, and reread my beloved practice poster (yes, there is a practice poster for breakdancing). I watch and study MTV like a must-see webinar. And the movies! Oh, I watch every single one the day it is released. Now, I’m not really all that good. Dreamsof being a dancer on a rap video are just dreams. But I can spin around on my head and not get sent to the hospital. I work at honing these skills leading up to the next military assignmentthat my mom and I take to Belgium, then Germany. During my high school years, I find to secure the social life I want, I amgoing to need to learn different dances for different occasions. Sure, breakdancing is a great fit for house parties, but what about the Semi-formal winter dance or the Formal Prom. If I amgoing to get dates and not look like a fool, I am going to need to dabble in the right kind of dancing to move my social life along.

Advancing your career with training and education is a lot like learning the right dance. All of the dances are great, but serve a different purpose.

• Dances at the house party is down to earth, wild, sometimes crazy or zany. In your career, this equates to training in the fire service. The drills for new people. Improving the skills of tenured people. Working with other stations and units. There is a general way it should be done, but there is room for creativity.

• Semi-formal dances have a bit more structure. These are your conferences, conventions, 1-3-day trainings. Going to regional schools. Going to FDIC and FRI. They are home grown classes that may have originated at the fire station, but are now on a bigger stage.

• Formal danceshave set expectations for how the event is happening. Dress like this. Move this way. These include official college certifications and formal classes such as Fire Officer I. They take more time and have a set structure. That structure allows for your education to be comparable to others across the world. It helps to measure your investment. It helps to increase your creditability.

Just like my dance life, you will do the most good for yourself by attending all the dances. Over reliance on station training may mean not keeping up with best practices. Over reliance on college and other formal training classes will lead to understanding theory, and not practical application. You are advancing your fire service life; your fire service career. Be sure to take part in training and education in all three parts to be ready for the big dances that are coming. And you won’t need to spin on your head, either!

Ordinary People Have Extraordinary Impact.

About the Author

 NICK BASKERVILLE Nick has had the honor of serving in the United States Air Force for 10 years, followed by 4 years in the United States Air Force Reserves. He attained the rank of Technical Sergeant (E-6). Nick also has 18 years of fire service time, with 15 years of that being in a career department in Northern Virginia. Nick has had the opportunity to hold positions in the Company Officer's section of the Virginia Fire Chief's Association (VFCA), The Virginia Fire Officer's Academy (VFOA) staff, and as one of the IABPFF representatives to the Fire Service Occupational Cancer Alliance. Nick is one of the many trainers for Firefighter Cancer Support Network (FCSN) to offer awareness and prevention training about cancer in the fire service. Nick has the honor of being one of the many contributors for The Firehouse Tribune.

You Have Just One Job

 "This shouldn't take too long." I'm not talking to anyone;that's just the thought in my head as I get ready to clean the bathroom today. On the first floor of my house there is a half bath that is just after the front door, on the right side. It's just close enough to the door that if you pull in to the parking space, Dukes of Hazzard style, and busted through the front door to use the bathroom, you can make it without an 'accident' happening. The bathroom needs cleaning. I go to work using an assortment of cleaners; being careful not to cause a hazardous environment needing 911. Now, it's time to mop. That is also the time things go in a new direction. I go to the hallway closet a few feet away on the other side of the hallway. I see a mop handle sticking up, but there is all this stuff in the way. I start cleaning the closet to get to the mop to clean the bathroom. I now have two bags of things to throw out, brooms and other floor cleaning devices neatly arranged, but no mop. A wide area search (of a townhouse, mind you) leads to finding the mop in another bathroom upstairs. To recap, I have cleaned the closet, to find and clean the mop, so I can finish cleaning the bathroom. But while cleaning the mop, I notice there may be a leak coming from the sink I used. So, after cleaning the closet to get the mop, I found and cleaned the mop, then found the leak, then cleaned up the water from the leak to clean the, uh…what was I supposed to be doing again?

At that moment, I see myself in a place I have been before. Perhaps you have found yourself in that same place. I have one thing on my mind to do. In the process of working on that one thing, I accomplish 3 or 4 other things. Never what I set out to do in the first place. Once I realize the situation I am in, it was easy to tell I didn’t use my focus habit.What habit do I use to keep my focus? The yellow sticky note habit.

People who have worked with me have seen and made fun of my yellow sticky note habit. I admit, it's definitely a little odd. I can't remember how I got started using it, but I've done if for a while. I take two 3-inch yellow sticky notes and stick them together back to back so the sticky parts are at opposite ends. Now I have a 3-inch paper that I can write on both sides. On only one side of the note, I write the date and everything I want to try accomplish that day. The rest of the day, the list resides in my pocket. Periodically for the rest of the day, I look at my list and see what I have done, and what I still need to do. Whatever I don't finish, goes on the list for the next day.

Time has taught me that the size of that paper doesn't allow me to put more on it than I can finish in one day. I stay focused, keep track of my progress, and I can evaluate if what I'm doing is more important that what is on my list. I use this at the station, at the office, and sometimes at home. I get laughs about my list at the station, at the office, and sometimes at home. I find that I am more efficient and productive at the station, at the office, and sometimes, at home.

My habit for staying focused may not be for you. It doesn't have to be. We all, however, need some way to keep focused on our intended tasks. Completing tasks, completes objectives. Completing objectives, completes goals. And completing goals is how ordinary people have extraordinary impact.

 About the Author

 NICK BASKERVILLE Nick has had the honor of serving in the United States Air Force for 10 years, followed by 4 years in the United States Air Force Reserves. He attained the rank of Technical Sergeant (E-6). Nick also has 18 years of fire service time, with 15 years of that being in a career department in Northern Virginia. Nick has had

the opportunity to hold positions in the Company Officer's section of the Virginia Fire Chief's Association (VFCA), The Virginia Fire Officer's Academy (VFOA) staff, and as one of the IABPFF representatives to the Fire Service Occupational Cancer Alliance. Nick is one of the many trainers for Firefighter Cancer Support Network (FCSN) to offer awareness and prevention training about cancer in the fire service. Nick has the honor of being one of the many contributors for The Firehouse Tribune.

Nick is also a member of the public speaking organization Toastmasters. He holds an Advanced
Competent Bronze (ACB) certification. He also tells personal narrative stories that have been featured
on shows for The Moth, Better Said Than Done, and Storyfest Short Slam. Follow more about storytelling
and public speaking for purpose at Story Telling On Purpose (www.stop365.wordpress.com)

When It Rains...

It's just another day at work. More things to do than time in the day. I'm at the fire station, making my way up the stairs to fit in what I can. Up the stairs, I make my way down the walk way and take the second left. I open the office door just to drop off my coffee cup. Training is about to happen and I don’t want to be late. I don’t turn on the light, at first. But what is that sound? It reminds me of running water? That doesn’t make sense. There is no water in the office.

I turn on the light and oh my, what a sight!One of the ceiling tiles looks more like a cloud instead of a part of the ceiling. It was full of water and beginning to rain down on the entire office. The air condition system is located in the ceiling, just above the office. I have heard stories of how it leaked before. I now have my own story.

As a new officer, I'm still working through the gut reaction to be in the thick of the problem. To get directly involved on fixing the problem hands-on. On this day, however, I activate a skill that have cultivated for years.A skill perfect for this situation. That skill?Ignorance.I understand what to do with a busted hose line. I understand what to do for a spill for muriatic acid. I know nothing about what to do for a leaky ceiling. I knew enough to know, however, that there was a problem. Even officers know water is not supposed to come from the ceiling. Sizing up the situation, I knew I need more resources. Downstairsare 2-3 firefighters who would know exactly what to do. I went downstairs and hustled back with a strike team of people to handle with the problem.

What did I do? I took two steps back and supported the plumbing strike team while they worked. I handed them a wrench when asked. I held the ladder when needed. I called the maintenance person for the long-term fix. As things are windingdown, the Battalion Chief stopped by. Chief’s seem to either have a 6th sense or hidden camera that tell them when to stop by the station."Where's the guy in charge?"All fingers point to me in the corner coordinating with the HAVAC vendor on when they can fix the problem.

Sometimes being in charge means letting the right people use their skill. Especially when you don't have that skill. I have learned something long ago that I have just managed to put into words. I don't have to be the smartest person in the room in order to lead the room. Let the ordinary people have the extraordinary impact.

 About the Author

NICK BASKERVILLE has had the honor of serving in the United States Air Force for 10 years, followed by 4 years in the United States Air Force Reserves. He attained the rank of Technical Sergeant (E-6). Nick also has 16 years of fire service time, with 13 years of that being in a career department in Northern Virginia. Nick has had the opportunity to hold positions in the Company Officer's section of the Virginia Fire Chief's Association (VFCA), The Virginia Fire Officer's Academy (VFOA) staff, and in the International Association of Black Professional Fire Fighters (IABPFF) as a chapter president, a Health and Wellness committee member, and one of the IABPFF representatives to the Fire Service Occupational Cancer Alliance. 

Truck Company Operations: LOVERS__U

The fire service loves acronyms and we have a lot of them. For this discussion we are going to talk about the old acronym for all you truckies out there – LOVERS_U. Before we get into the acronym and details of it, let’s first talk simply about truck company ops.

Truck operations involve a variety of tasks; forcible entry, search, rescue, ventilation, ladder operations (ground/aerial), overhaul, etc. Nowadays with the lack of manpower, squad and engine companies may be needed to perform these operations at any time on the fire ground and are equipped with the tools to do so. Some engine companies may need to perform both truck and engine operations due to lack of manpower or the absence of a truck on scene and vice versa for companies who run quints.

Well here we are, a truck company; what do we do?

Let’s being here with LOVERS_U:

1. Size-up (Yes, truck has its own size up to do). Everything we do on the fire ground calls for a scene size up (and a continual one) to better help us make smart tactical decisions to effectively complete our tasks especially with ventilation. Can this start the LOVERS_U? Hmm….

2. Forcible Entry, if needed (for searching and fire suppression). Sometimes the doors may be unlocked so like they say, “trybefore you pry”. This action should be determined quickly upon arrival in the case of victim removals. Please remember to keep this simple. Remembering your basic tools such as the irons, a hook and/or saw along with variations or combinations of each, can save time and get the job done. The key here is to know your tools and how to use them efficiently.

3. Search (Rescue, if needed). This is very important because we are not only searching for victims but searching for fire both of which may or may not be identifiable from the outside which is why searching is critical on the fire ground. Let’s remember searching for fire can also be done by the suppression team as well. Don’t forget your TIC.

4. a. Ventilation for search team (Vent for life). By venting for life, it is allowing a lot of the thick, black smoke remove itself from the structure giving search teams inside better visibility and time for locating victims.

b. Ventilation for fire suppression (Vent for fire). By venting for fire, this assists the fire suppression team in making an easier push to the fire and much easier extinguishment. This is done with very precise communication between your crew, the suppression team inside and the IC. If done haphazardly, this can be catastrophic.

5. Ladder the building (ingress, egress, vertical/horizontal vent). Every window accessible should have a ladder on it for emergency egress and also for access to the roof and 2nd floor windows for vertical vent. Why not throw a ladder up while heading with your crew to your assignment? Kill 2 birds with 1 stone.

6. Overhaul/Salvage. Once the fire is determined to be out, now it’s time to get inside and open the place up. This is to look for any hotspots and perform another search should any victims have not been found. During this operation, SCBA is still required along with a TIC and hand tools. Using tarps are also considered to help salvage as much property as possible and avoid any smoke and/or water damage.

7. Utilities. This is also known as shutting  down the utilities. Depending on where the utilities are located, this is done by either an interior crew or an exterior crew. Having control of gas, electric and water will help increase the safety of all fire service personnel on the scene.

Now that we discussed primary responsibilities of the truck company, we can now collectively say we have described and discussed LOVERS_U. For all those on truck companies or working with truck company responsibilities keep this acronym in your toolbox when pulling up to a scene, during your pre plans and in your training. It’s a valuable guide to helping you get the job done efficiently, effectively and most importantly safely. 

Until next time; work hard, stay safe & live inspired.

 About the Author

 NICHOLAS J. HIGGINS is a firefighter with 16 years in the fire service in Piscataway, NJ as well as NJ State certified level 2 fire instructor and currently a State of New Jersey Advocate for the National Fallen Firefighter’s Foundation. A martial arts practitioner in Taekwondo, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Muay Thai as well as a former collegiate athlete in baseball, Nick is also a National Exercise & Sports Trainer Association Battle Ropes Instructor and studying for the Functional Fitness Instructor certification.  He holds a B.S. in Accounting from Kean University and is the founder/contributor of the Firehouse Tribune website.