The Back Up Firefighter

As a firefighter riding in the engine we all want to be on the nozzle, fighting the fire head on, producing a solid fire attack to the fire and getting cheers from our fellow firefighters for a quick solid knock. However, not everyone can always be the nozzle man and get to be face to face with the fire. Sometimes we need to be the backup or the setup man if you will. It's not pretty or glorified but in this line of business someone has to do it and at one point in time many of us get that assignment. The assignments may be cumbersome but a solid, ready to fight backup firefighter is critical to a successful and aggressive interior fire attack.  

As the old saying goes, "the fire goes as the fire line goes" and without an experienced backup firefighter, the advancement, fire suppression and a long day at the office will prevail; not to mention a not too happy nozzle man. 

Here's a few tips every backup firefighter on the line should consider.

   1. Ensure there are no kinks in the line, especially the first 50 feet behind the nozzle. Kinks will be detrimental to a sufficient fire flow and delay hose advancement.
2. Hit the hydrant and establish a water supply to the engine. If there is a short crew, this may be the job of the backup firefighter. Ensure your hydrant skills are efficient and ready to go. Timing is everything.
3. Force the door. If the engine is first on scene, ensure the line is stretched and be prepared to possibly force the door if needed.
4. Search off the line. Perform a primary search if no truck company is in place yet. 
5. If needed, be the second or third set of eyes and ears for the nozzle man. Watch the fire's behavior and carefully monitor conditions in the room and update the nozzle man and officer if there's a sense conditions are deteriorating and a flashover and/or collapse is imminent.

If you're assigned as the backup firefighter get ready before the call comes in (physically/mentally)and ensure all PPE and equipment is ready to go. A successful fire attack is counting on it so get ready and stay ready.

Until next time; work hard, stay safe & live inspired.

About the Author

NICHOLAS J. HIGGINS is a firefighter with 17 years in the fire service in Piscataway, NJ, a NJ State certified level 2 fire instructor, a State of New Jersey Advocate for the National Fallen Firefighter’s Foundation and is the founder/contributor of the Firehouse Tribune website. A martial arts practitioner and former collegiate athlete in baseball, Nick is also a National Exercise & Sports Trainer Association Battle Ropes Instructor, Functional Fitness Instructor and Nutrition Coach.  He holds a B.S. in Accounting from Kean University, and a A.A.S in Liberal Arts - Business from Middlesex County College. Nick has spoken at the 2017 & 2018 Firehouse Expo in Nashville, TN as well as at numerous fire departments within NJ and fire service podcasts.





Re-Present Yourself to Represent Your Department

From the time we enter the academy to the time we are sworn in as firefighters, we are training to become a better version of ourselves. Even after we graduate and begin our time as a firefighter we are still training each and every day to improve ourselves to become a better version of ourselves but what about the department and community we serve? They say the name on the helmet represents the department and the name on the jacket represents who raised you. Well, what if the name on the helmet and the name on the jacket are not only being represented by you but your “re-presenting” those names through you? 

Think about that for a minute. The 2 names on your uniform are being “re-presenting” through you. The town, the communities and other agencies know the department on the helmet and may quiet possibly know the name on the jacket but it’s how the names are carried and “re-presented” that makes the difference. It’s easy to put the uniform on and go to work but it’s another thing to put the uniform on and go to work with humility, honor and respect. Ask yourself these questions when you’re “re-presenting” the names because this is how you are “re-presenting” your department and your name to others.

1. Am I respectful to my boss and my crew?

2. Am I humble?

3. Do I respect the job?

4. How do I want these names to be “re-presented” to my fellow firefighters and the community?

5. Am I training hard each and every day to improve myself mentality and physically?

6. Would I be able to lead myself?

Being a firefighter and wearing the uniform isn’t a right, it’s a privilege. A privilege many people wish they had and a privilege that can be taken away at any moment. Be conscious of how you act and speak when wearing any part of that uniform on and off duty, it’s showing how you present yourself and also how you are “re-presenting” the names on that uniform. So do a service to your department, the community you sworn to protect, your fellow firefighters who ride alongside you, your family and most importantly yourself and “re-present” them the way you would want someone to “re-present” you. 

Until next time; work hard, stay safe & live inspired.

About the Author

NICHOLAS J. HIGGINS is a firefighter with 17 years in the fire service in Piscataway, NJ, a NJ State certified level 2 fire instructor, a State of New Jersey Advocate for the National Fallen Firefighter’s Foundation and is the founder/contributor of the Firehouse Tribune website. A martial arts practitioner and former collegiate athlete in baseball, Nick is also a National Exercise & Sports Trainer Association Battle Ropes Instructor, Functional Fitness Instructor and Nutrition Coach.  He holds a B.S. in Accounting from Kean University, and a A.A.S in Liberal Arts - Business from Middlesex County College. Nick has spoken at the 2017 & 2018 Firehouse Expo in Nashville, TN as well as at numerous fire departments within NJ and fire service podcasts.

 

Blank Slate

This past year my wife and I were blessed to welcome the birth of our first child. For those who are parents know the thoughts that go through your mind; joy, excitement, nervousness, and worry just to name a few. The last 7 months have been the most amazing and important yet difficult time we’ve ever experienced.

Each day we watch our son grow, learn and take on life. He learns a little more and more about himself and us each day and us the same about him. The one thing I’ve noticed as he discovers life and becomes his own little person is his impressionable innocence. Everything he’s exposed to and everything he’s taught is absorbed like a sponge.

The same is true for those entering the fire service. New recruits come in as an empty slate who, for the most part don't know anyone or how anything works and will absorb everything they hear, see and read like a sponge. In order to keep the fire service family and brotherhood alive, it is upon us, the current generation to do our best to not allow any negative emotions or feelings towards a fellow firefighter and departmental policies be absorbed by the newer generations coming in. The best thing we could do is to look at the things we don't agree with and turn it into a positive remembering why we signed up for this job. Just like babies, new recruits are excited and have an eagerness to learn, grow and a hunger to prove themselves worthy of this job. So let's embrace the newer generations entering the fire service and show them that although there is downsides to what we do, we can always walk in with a smile on our face,  have an eagerness to learn and a willingness to always pay it forward with the hopes of developing the generations to come.

Until next time; work hard, stay safe & live inspired

About the Author

NICHOLAS J. HIGGINS is a firefighter with 17 years in the fire service in Piscataway, NJ, a NJ State certified level 2 fire instructor, a State of New Jersey Advocate for the National Fallen Firefighter’s Foundation and is the founder/contributor of the Firehouse Tribune website. A martial arts practitioner and former collegiate athlete in baseball, Nick is also a National Exercise & Sports Trainer Association Battle Ropes Instructor, Functional Fitness Instructor and Nutrition Coach.  He holds a B.S. in Accounting from Kean University, and a A.A.S in Liberal Arts - Business from Middlesex County College. Nick has spoken at the 2017 & 2018 Firehouse Expo in Nashville, TN as well as at numerous fire departments within NJ and fire service podcasts.