The Back Up Firefighter

As a firefighter riding in the engine we all want to be on the nozzle, fighting the fire head on, producing a solid fire attack to the fire and getting cheers from our fellow firefighters for a quick solid knock. However, not everyone can always be the nozzle man and get to be face to face with the fire. Sometimes we need to be the backup or the setup man if you will. It's not pretty or glorified but in this line of business someone has to do it and at one point in time many of us get that assignment. The assignments may be cumbersome but a solid, ready to fight backup firefighter is critical to a successful and aggressive interior fire attack.  

As the old saying goes, "the fire goes as the fire line goes" and without an experienced backup firefighter, the advancement, fire suppression and a long day at the office will prevail; not to mention a not too happy nozzle man. 

Here's a few tips every backup firefighter on the line should consider.

   1. Ensure there are no kinks in the line, especially the first 50 feet behind the nozzle. Kinks will be detrimental to a sufficient fire flow and delay hose advancement.
2. Hit the hydrant and establish a water supply to the engine. If there is a short crew, this may be the job of the backup firefighter. Ensure your hydrant skills are efficient and ready to go. Timing is everything.
3. Force the door. If the engine is first on scene, ensure the line is stretched and be prepared to possibly force the door if needed.
4. Search off the line. Perform a primary search if no truck company is in place yet. 
5. If needed, be the second or third set of eyes and ears for the nozzle man. Watch the fire's behavior and carefully monitor conditions in the room and update the nozzle man and officer if there's a sense conditions are deteriorating and a flashover and/or collapse is imminent.

If you're assigned as the backup firefighter get ready before the call comes in (physically/mentally)and ensure all PPE and equipment is ready to go. A successful fire attack is counting on it so get ready and stay ready.

Until next time; work hard, stay safe & live inspired.

About the Author

NICHOLAS J. HIGGINS is a firefighter with 17 years in the fire service in Piscataway, NJ, a NJ State certified level 2 fire instructor, a State of New Jersey Advocate for the National Fallen Firefighter’s Foundation and is the founder/contributor of the Firehouse Tribune website. A martial arts practitioner and former collegiate athlete in baseball, Nick is also a National Exercise & Sports Trainer Association Battle Ropes Instructor, Functional Fitness Instructor and Nutrition Coach.  He holds a B.S. in Accounting from Kean University, and a A.A.S in Liberal Arts - Business from Middlesex County College. Nick has spoken at the 2017 & 2018 Firehouse Expo in Nashville, TN as well as at numerous fire departments within NJ and fire service podcasts.





Re-Present Yourself to Represent Your Department

From the time we enter the academy to the time we are sworn in as firefighters, we are training to become a better version of ourselves. Even after we graduate and begin our time as a firefighter we are still training each and every day to improve ourselves to become a better version of ourselves but what about the department and community we serve? They say the name on the helmet represents the department and the name on the jacket represents who raised you. Well, what if the name on the helmet and the name on the jacket are not only being represented by you but your “re-presenting” those names through you? 

Think about that for a minute. The 2 names on your uniform are being “re-presenting” through you. The town, the communities and other agencies know the department on the helmet and may quiet possibly know the name on the jacket but it’s how the names are carried and “re-presented” that makes the difference. It’s easy to put the uniform on and go to work but it’s another thing to put the uniform on and go to work with humility, honor and respect. Ask yourself these questions when you’re “re-presenting” the names because this is how you are “re-presenting” your department and your name to others.

1. Am I respectful to my boss and my crew?

2. Am I humble?

3. Do I respect the job?

4. How do I want these names to be “re-presented” to my fellow firefighters and the community?

5. Am I training hard each and every day to improve myself mentality and physically?

6. Would I be able to lead myself?

Being a firefighter and wearing the uniform isn’t a right, it’s a privilege. A privilege many people wish they had and a privilege that can be taken away at any moment. Be conscious of how you act and speak when wearing any part of that uniform on and off duty, it’s showing how you present yourself and also how you are “re-presenting” the names on that uniform. So do a service to your department, the community you sworn to protect, your fellow firefighters who ride alongside you, your family and most importantly yourself and “re-present” them the way you would want someone to “re-present” you. 

Until next time; work hard, stay safe & live inspired.

About the Author

NICHOLAS J. HIGGINS is a firefighter with 17 years in the fire service in Piscataway, NJ, a NJ State certified level 2 fire instructor, a State of New Jersey Advocate for the National Fallen Firefighter’s Foundation and is the founder/contributor of the Firehouse Tribune website. A martial arts practitioner and former collegiate athlete in baseball, Nick is also a National Exercise & Sports Trainer Association Battle Ropes Instructor, Functional Fitness Instructor and Nutrition Coach.  He holds a B.S. in Accounting from Kean University, and a A.A.S in Liberal Arts - Business from Middlesex County College. Nick has spoken at the 2017 & 2018 Firehouse Expo in Nashville, TN as well as at numerous fire departments within NJ and fire service podcasts.

 

Truck Company Operations: LOVERS__U

The fire service loves acronyms and we have a lot of them. For this discussion we are going to talk about the old acronym for all you truckies out there – LOVERS_U. Before we get into the acronym and details of it, let’s first talk simply about truck company ops.

Truck operations involve a variety of tasks; forcible entry, search, rescue, ventilation, ladder operations (ground/aerial), overhaul, etc. Nowadays with the lack of manpower, squad and engine companies may be needed to perform these operations at any time on the fire ground and are equipped with the tools to do so. Some engine companies may need to perform both truck and engine operations due to lack of manpower or the absence of a truck on scene and vice versa for companies who run quints.

Well here we are, a truck company; what do we do?

Let’s being here with LOVERS_U:

1. Size-up (Yes, truck has its own size up to do). Everything we do on the fire ground calls for a scene size up (and a continual one) to better help us make smart tactical decisions to effectively complete our tasks especially with ventilation. Can this start the LOVERS_U? Hmm….

2. Forcible Entry, if needed (for searching and fire suppression). Sometimes the doors may be unlocked so like they say, “trybefore you pry”. This action should be determined quickly upon arrival in the case of victim removals. Please remember to keep this simple. Remembering your basic tools such as the irons, a hook and/or saw along with variations or combinations of each, can save time and get the job done. The key here is to know your tools and how to use them efficiently.

3. Search (Rescue, if needed). This is very important because we are not only searching for victims but searching for fire both of which may or may not be identifiable from the outside which is why searching is critical on the fire ground. Let’s remember searching for fire can also be done by the suppression team as well. Don’t forget your TIC.

4. a. Ventilation for search team (Vent for life). By venting for life, it is allowing a lot of the thick, black smoke remove itself from the structure giving search teams inside better visibility and time for locating victims.

b. Ventilation for fire suppression (Vent for fire). By venting for fire, this assists the fire suppression team in making an easier push to the fire and much easier extinguishment. This is done with very precise communication between your crew, the suppression team inside and the IC. If done haphazardly, this can be catastrophic.

5. Ladder the building (ingress, egress, vertical/horizontal vent). Every window accessible should have a ladder on it for emergency egress and also for access to the roof and 2nd floor windows for vertical vent. Why not throw a ladder up while heading with your crew to your assignment? Kill 2 birds with 1 stone.

6. Overhaul/Salvage. Once the fire is determined to be out, now it’s time to get inside and open the place up. This is to look for any hotspots and perform another search should any victims have not been found. During this operation, SCBA is still required along with a TIC and hand tools. Using tarps are also considered to help salvage as much property as possible and avoid any smoke and/or water damage.

7. Utilities. This is also known as shutting  down the utilities. Depending on where the utilities are located, this is done by either an interior crew or an exterior crew. Having control of gas, electric and water will help increase the safety of all fire service personnel on the scene.

Now that we discussed primary responsibilities of the truck company, we can now collectively say we have described and discussed LOVERS_U. For all those on truck companies or working with truck company responsibilities keep this acronym in your toolbox when pulling up to a scene, during your pre plans and in your training. It’s a valuable guide to helping you get the job done efficiently, effectively and most importantly safely. 

Until next time; work hard, stay safe & live inspired.

 About the Author

 NICHOLAS J. HIGGINS is a firefighter with 16 years in the fire service in Piscataway, NJ as well as NJ State certified level 2 fire instructor and currently a State of New Jersey Advocate for the National Fallen Firefighter’s Foundation. A martial arts practitioner in Taekwondo, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Muay Thai as well as a former collegiate athlete in baseball, Nick is also a National Exercise & Sports Trainer Association Battle Ropes Instructor and studying for the Functional Fitness Instructor certification.  He holds a B.S. in Accounting from Kean University and is the founder/contributor of the Firehouse Tribune website.

Improve Your Cholesterol, Improve Your Career

Heart Disease is the leading cause of death of both men and women in the United States. It’s also one the leading causes of death in firefighters and for more than 1 reason. However, in this article we are discussing it with its link to cholesterol. So what is cholesterol and what does it due to our bodies?

For starters, cholesterol is a fat found in your blood that is developed in the liver but your body can also receive it from meat, fish, eggs, butter, cheese, and whole or low-fat milk. Everyone needs some cholesterol in their bodies in order to function properly such as your brain, skin and bodily organs. What cholesterol is doing for your body is acting a building block for your cells as well as helping repair damaged cells especially ones found in the blood vessels and the dietary tract.

If cholesterol is helping your body, why is it bad?

Well, foodhigh in additives, preservatives and other toxic processes will cause cells to become damaged and are most likely found in refined and processed carbohydrates. This will cause the cholesterol to flow around the blood and eventually cling onto the walls of your blood vessels, thus causing the vessels to become narrower as time goes on eventually clogging the vessels. A clogged vessel does not allow for proper blood flow through the vessel potentially causing a heart attack (lack of oxygen-rich blood)or stroke (decreased blood flow to thebrain) to name a few.

To be on top of our game and have long lasting career and life, we can as firefighters help ourselves and families to help improve our cholesterol levels.

1. Eat heart-healthy foods

a. Healthier Fats

i. Saturated fats, founds in red meat and dairy will raise your total cholesterol levels and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) also known as “bad” cholesterol. Rule of thumb: 7% or less of your daily caloric intake should be from saturated fats.

ii. Leaner cuts of meat such as London broil, top sirloin, chicken breast, 96% lean ground beef and pork tenderloin are other healthier options along with low-fat dairy and monounsaturated fats which is found in olive and canola oils.

b. Eliminate Trans Fats

i. Trans fats affect cholesterol levels by increasing LDL levels (“bad”) and lowering the (“good”) HDL levels. Trans fats can be found in fried foods and many processed foods such as cookies, crackers and snack cakes. In the U.S., food containing less than 0.5 grams of trans fat per serving is consider “trans fat-free”.

c. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

i. Omega-3’s don’t have an effect on LDL cholesterol (“bad”) however it does have heart benefits. Some benefits omega-3 has are helping to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL or “good”), reducing triglycerides (type of fat in blood) and reduces blood pressure.

ii. Types of fish rich in omega-3 are salmon, mackerel and herring. Other good sources include krill oil, walnuts and almonds.

d. Soluble Fiber

i. There are 2 types of fiber – soluble and insoluble. Although both have heart-health benefits, soluble fiber also helps to lower your LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and all you’ll need to do is all a little more fiber to your diet.

ii. High in fiber foods are oats, fruits, beans, lentils and vegetables.

e. Whey Protein

i. Whey protein given as a supplement according to studies has shown to lower both LDL and total cholesterol. So if you’re in the gym, at home or in the firehouse working out and GETTING AFTER IT, don’t forget to include whey protein in your diet.

2. Exercise

i. Exercise has been known to improve cholesterol especially help raise HDL (“good”) cholesterol. Before engaging in any physical activities, please consult with your physician beforehand.

If you want a long, healthy and prosperous career and a long life with your family your health comes first. Protecting the front lines and take care of our own comes above all else. Please remember to consult with your physician before looking into any of these recommendations as this is for informational purposes.

Until next time; work hard, stay safe & live inspired.

About the Author

NICHOLAS J. HIGGINS is a firefighter with 16 years in the fire service in Piscataway, NJ, a NJ State certified level 2 fire instructor and a State of New Jersey Advocate for the National Fallen Firefighter’s Foundation. A martial arts practitioner in Taekwondo, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Muay Thai as well as a former collegiate athlete in baseball, Nick is a National Exercise & Sports Trainer Association Battle Ropes Instructor and studying for the Functional Fitness Instructor certification.  He holds a B.S. in Accounting from Kean University and is the founder/contributor of the Firehouse Tribune website.  

The 10 Minute Workout

One of our biggest excuses for lack of exercise is simple, it’s lack of time. Most of our time is spent working, sleeping, family obligations and friends. Very rarely do people say they have or make time for exercise, which in our profession is very unfortunate since as we’ve said in numerous posts thus far, we are “functional athletes” and need to behave, think and train like one; mentality and physically. 

In order to enjoy our life, our family, friends, combat the stress of the job and continue to feel healthy for the long haul, exercise is essential to this and what I am sharing with you all today is the 10 min work out you can do at home, in the gym, on the go and even in the firehouse alone or with your crew.

Why am I saying all of this?
According to the Department of Health and Human Services, it is recommended to have at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic pace exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise per week. Depending on how hard you work out that will equate to 21 minutes per day of moderate aerobic pace exercise or 11 minutes per day of vigorous exercise.

So here are a few options of the 10 minute workout:

1.    Jogging: This is great for cardiovascular health, lowering your blood pressure and cholesterol and is known to decrease the risk of osteoporosis. The American Council on Exercise states that an individual weighing 180lbs can burn up to 170 calories by taking a 10min jog.
2.    High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT): This is my personal favorite and although it burns calories and fat quickly, it is not recommended for beginners. HIIT is a form of interval training and cardiovascular exercise training alternating short periods of intense anaerobic exercise with less intense recovery periods. This type of workout will challenge your cardiovascular system more than jogging along with added benefits such as increasing your metabolism, improves cholesterol profile and increases insulin sensitivity. A bodyweight HIIT Workout would look something like this: 50 sit-ups, 40 jump squats (or body squats), 30 pushups, 20 split jumps, 10 triceps dips, as many burpees as possible in 30 seconds. You will take a 30 second rest between each exercise in order to perform each exercise with 100% effort. 
3.    Circuit Training: This a great strength training workout due to strength training .Generally strength training requires rest periods between sets for muscle recovery however with circuit training uses antagonistic muscles (when one muscle contracts, the other relaxes, i.e. biceps and triceps) allowing for shorter rest periods An example of this would be as follows: 3 sets of 10 reps.
a.    Pushups
b.    Hollow body hold
c.    Squats
d.    Glute bridges
e.    Bench dips
f.    Plank hold (30-60 sec holds)
4.    Jump Rope: Jumping rope can burn more than 10 calories in a minute and a great way for overall body toning. Here is a quick jump rope workout you can do anywhere. 60 seconds regular jump, 60 seconds rope side to side, 60 seconds single leg (left), 60 seconds single leg (right). The goal is to do this routine non-stop for 2 rounds. If you are new to this, do regular jumps for 60 seconds for 4 rounds with 30 second rests. For the single leg jumps, start with the weaker or less dominant side first. 

So, there you have it. Four different workouts we can do any time, any where for overall health. Incorporate these into your daily life will have you feeling healthier, stronger and battle ready to perform when the alarm goes off.  

Please note: Always consult with your physician before getting into physical activities while recovering from any injury or surgery. It may not be the best treatment option after an injury or surgery or may be limited to particular modalities.

Until next time: work hard, stay safe & live inspired.

About the Author

NICHOLAS J. HIGGINS is a firefighter with 16 years in the fire service in Piscataway, NJ as well as NJ State certified level 2 fire instructor and currently a State of New Jersey Advocate for the National Fallen Firefighter’s Foundation. He has also been elected as a township elected District Fire Commissioner for 1 term (3 years) in Piscataway, NJ from 2008-2011. A blue belt in taekwondo and former collegiate athlete, Nick is currently studying to complete his certification as a TRX Instructor and a Battle Ropes Instructor. He holds a B.S. in Accounting from Kean University and is the founder/contributor of the Firehouse Tribune website.

 

Sleep and Firefighters

One thing firefighters have been known to lack, is lack of sleep. Generally, not something that is talked about or brought up in conversation, but lack of sleep has links to firefighter injury and death. Think about it, emergency service personnel live off shift work and interrupted sleep patterns which are out of their control since alarms can happen any time of any day.

According to The Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, sleep or interrupted sleep patterns could be a major factor in more than 60 percent of firefighter deaths. The majority of these are caused by heart attacks and traffic accidents. Research has shown that approximately 7,000 firefighters have reported to suffer from numerous sleep disorders such as obstructed sleep apnea, insomnia and shift-work disorder which was reported by the New York Times.

They also reported firefighters are also more likely to develop serious health problems such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, depression and anxiety because of sleep disorders. In addition to these health problems, firefighters are also likely to report an increase in kidney disease, high blood pressure, stroke and obesity.

NYTHEALTH RESEARCH

Firefighter Deaths Could be Linked to Poor Sleep

Helen Regan Nov. 14, 2014

Sleep plays an integral role in physical health and especially of one of a functional athlete.

The human body is built with an internal clock and changing to our sleep patterns at any time can disrupt or alter the internal clock which is built on routine – something we don’t have much of as firefighters. While sleeping our bodies are healing and repairing our heart, blood vessels, muscles and allowing our bodies to heal. In addition, sleep with repair and consolidate memory. 

So what could we do to ensure we get a sufficient amount of sleep off duty so we are recharged and energized for our next shift?

Here are a few tips to try while off duty:

1. Routine. This is important. Stick to a sleep schedule while home.

2. Power Down. Turn off or avoid all electronic devices 30-60 minutes prior to bed.

3. Keep Cool. Try to keep the bedroom cooler than other areas of the house. Majority of people sleep more soundly in a cooler bedroom.

4. No alcohol or caffeine. Both are known to disrupt sleep patterns either by unexpected wake ups or restless sleep.

5. Comfort. Invest in a pillow and/or mattress that’s comforting to you. This also helps eliminate muscle, nerve and joint pains especially headaches.

6. FAST. Try hard to avoid large meals close to bedtime as much as possible.

Proper training, proper nutrition and proper recovery (along with sleep) are all vital to our success as firefighters on the job and off. 

Until next time; work hard, stay safe & life inspired.

About the Author

NICHOLAS J. HIGGINS is a firefighter with 16 years in the fire service all within departments in Piscataway, NJ. Nick has held the ranks of Lieutenant and Captain as well as being a township elected District Fire Commissioner for 1 term (3 years) in Piscataway, NJ. He is also a NJ State certified level 2 fire instructor and currently a State of New Jersey Advocate for the National Fallen Firefighter’s Foundation. He holds a B.S. in Accounting from Kean University working in Corporate Taxation and is the founder/contributor of the Firehouse Tribune website.